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Hello! Im itching to plant these first earlies out, (Arran Pilot I think)...is it too early due to frost? Im Oxfordshire way. They will be in bags poss up to 5 in each due to space constraints. I have some fleece that I could put on top but Im new to this. Im chitting my second earlies and main crop for later planting - again advice on these would be good.

Hello! I'm itching to plant these first earlies out, (Arran Pilot I think)...is it too early due to frost? I'm Oxfordshire way. They will be in bags poss up to 5 in each due to space constraints. I have some fleece that I could put on top but I'm new to this. I'm chitting my second earlies and main crop for later planting - again advice on these would be good. ... See MoreSee Less

16 hours ago

Comment on Facebook

Im in the Scottish Borders and have been stung too many times planting out too early and then the plants get frost bitten. They usually grow back but will stunt output. I’m not planting mine out for another 5 weeks but you’d get away with earlier in Oxfordshire.

This is my favourite calendar for getting planting times for your area www.gardenfocused.co.uk/calendar-veg-personalised.php. You are probably close enough to Charles Dowding No Dig Gardening to follow his dates too charlesdowding.co.uk/sowing-timeline-for-vegetables/ He plants early potatoes in late March

5 is too many - you’ll just get lower yields per plant if you cram them in - go for 3 max per bag

What grows in our exposed, windy garden and what doesnt. Perpetual spinach (thanks Adam!) is doing well. However, my nurtured purple sprouting broccoli has succumbed to the snow and biting winds 😔

What grows in our exposed, windy garden and what doesn't. Perpetual spinach (thanks Adam!) is doing well. However, my nurtured purple sprouting broccoli has succumbed to the snow and biting winds 😔 ... See MoreSee Less

1 week ago

Comment on Facebook

Great to see that spinach holding up well Tamzin 💪

your spinach looks great! Sorry about your broccoli

That spinach looks fantastic. If you strip of the dead leaves of the broccoli it may have a wee growth regeneration?

Good old Spinach. Yeah, cut back the Broc, see what happens.

that sprouting broccoli looks bad but actually I bet it still will work out

My purple sprouting did the same! The stalk was mush even.

Mine has looked like this at this time of year for 2 years now and still sprouts all season, I’m sure it’ll be grand 🥰

Overwintered Kales flattened by snow but resprouting enough for several meals

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These seedlings  need soil asap, transplanting phase begins
 germinated Feb21st

These seedlings need soil asap, transplanting phase begins
germinated Feb21st
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1 day ago

Comment on Facebook

Oh that’s is good to know. I have just started germinating some lovely seeds from tomatoes I got in France 🇫🇷

# **Sprouting Alfalfa on paper towels**

I recently started sprouting Alfalfa seeds on paper towels and now keep a regular supply on the go. Super quick, clean, nutritious, cheap, and easy indoor food supply.

**Here's how...**
* Wet a paper towel
* Sprinkle the seeds on top
* Spray them with water
* Keep them damp by spraying twice a day
* Wait between one and two weeks
* Pull them up when you want them. They come off the paper towel very easily.
* Add them to hot and cold meals

Simple eh. They don’t need soil and they don’t need light. When you have pulled them all you add the leftovers to the compost heap.

You can pick up a 500g of organic Alfalfa Sprouting Seeds for around £8 and this will keep in Alfalfa Sprouts for ages. You might be able to find low-cost Alfalfa Sprouts and other Sprouts in supermarkets, but sprouting them yourself means you can access them totally fresh each day and avoids all the supermarket packaging and transportation. Sprouting from your own bag of seeds will also work out cheaper.

Alfalfa (also known as Lucerne) is a member of the legume family and is rich in a variety of vitamins, minerals, protein and antioxidants. It has long been used as a feed for livestock and a medicine for humans.

*Anyone else sprouting Alfalfa Seeds? Anyone got other methods of enjoying Alfalfa? Anyone got tips and recommendations for sprouting other kinds of seeds? Please leave a comment.*

**FREE food growing support from Food Community ***https://www.facebook.com/groups/foodcmty/*
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4 days ago

Comment on Facebook

I am trying with chia, and its day 2, I see sprouting !!! Thanks Adam !

I've always done them in sprouting trays and that way works well. Like Alfalfa for their nutty flavour, and they are apparently a complete source of essential amino acids and vitamins 🙂

I want to change m'y name to alfalfasprout

I grow them in canning jars with curtain material rubber-banded on the top and tipped at an angle in a dish drainer. All winter! Mung beans too!

Just sprouting rocket. Three days and I can see the roots.

Inspired by your posts, I've tried it with linseed but nothing much so far (now day 10). I did it on cottonwool though (that's what I remembered from doing it as a child and had no kitchen paper to hand). Maybe that's the problem?

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I started some seeds last weekend inside in my hallway and it’s quite bright as I have glass panes in the front door. Anyway in under a week some of them are about an inch long and I can see them leaning towards the light.
I don’t have a greenhouse but making some cold frames. Can these go outside under glass, I can cover with fleece at night. I just want the space to start more.
The ones that are growing so far are salad leaves, rocket, little gems, Savoy cabbage. Thank you.
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2 days ago

Comment on Facebook

Line a three sided box with foil, see pic, and put on a windowsill. Cold snap due this week so wouldn't put in coldframe yet.

As I sit and plot the coming season, I decided to share my dandelion musings from my herbal medicine studies. Please delete if not appropriate Adam Skelton 💚🍄 Dandelion sits and quietly waits. Ripping her out is often her fate. Her forgotten magic is tragic indeed. What of the power of her wonderous seed? Blowing in the wind our wishes disperse. Dandelion, oh dandelion. May your beauty be remembered in verse.

As I sit and plot the coming season, I decided to share my dandelion musings from my herbal medicine studies. Please delete if not appropriate Adam Skelton 💚🍄 Dandelion sits and quietly waits. Ripping her out is often her fate. Her forgotten magic is tragic indeed. What of the power of her wonderous seed? Blowing in the wind our wishes disperse. Dandelion, oh dandelion. May your beauty be remembered in verse. ... See MoreSee Less

3 days ago

Surviving Juicero & Thriving on Sprouts: Doug Evans | Rich Roll Podcast ... See MoreSee Less

2 days ago

Comment on Facebook

# **How to create new rhubarb plants**  Are you growing rhubarb? Are you seeing it coming to life again now? Now is an ideal time to divide your rhubarb crowns to propagate new identical plants for other parts of your garden or to share with neighbours.  Divide rhubarb crowns into sections using a spade. Only divide established plants. Each section should keep a bit of the root. Compost any decayed parts. Replant as soon as possible. If you plant more than one crown you should space plants about a metre apart. You can plant rhubarb crowns throughout the winter until Spring if you want to.  It is good practice to divide rhubarb every five years or so to stop them getting overcrowded and to keep them vibrant. Rhubarb can also be sown from seed in spring, but division is the more common way to propagate rhubarb.  Rhubarb is a vegetable that is very easy to grow and harvest and crops for over ten years. It is happy in any kind of soil and hardy to the weather, but likes full sun. Rhubarb stalks are the only edible part of the plant, the leaves are poisonous.  It is best to leave newly planted rhubarb for 2 years before harvesting from it so that it can fully establish itself. Rhubarb is ripe in the spring and summer, but you should wait to harvest until the stalks are at least 10 inches long. And it is a good idea to slow your harvesting in July so that the plant can recoup its energy to get through the winter.  *If anyone has any tips, questions or suggestions, please comment below.*  **Free food growing advice and support:**  www.foodcommunity.org.uk  www.facebook.com/groups/foodcmty  **Please share**Image attachment

# **How to create new rhubarb plants**

Are you growing rhubarb? Are you seeing it coming to life again now? Now is an ideal time to divide your rhubarb crowns to propagate new identical plants for other parts of your garden or to share with neighbours.

Divide rhubarb crowns into sections using a spade. Only divide established plants. Each section should keep a bit of the root. Compost any decayed parts. Replant as soon as possible. If you plant more than one crown you should space plants about a metre apart. You can plant rhubarb crowns throughout the winter until Spring if you want to.

It is good practice to divide rhubarb every five years or so to stop them getting overcrowded and to keep them vibrant. Rhubarb can also be sown from seed in spring, but division is the more common way to propagate rhubarb.

Rhubarb is a vegetable that is very easy to grow and harvest and crops for over ten years. It is happy in any kind of soil and hardy to the weather, but likes full sun. Rhubarb stalks are the only edible part of the plant, the leaves are poisonous.

It is best to leave newly planted rhubarb for 2 years before harvesting from it so that it can fully establish itself. Rhubarb is ripe in the spring and summer, but you should wait to harvest until the stalks are at least 10 inches long. And it is a good idea to slow your harvesting in July so that the plant can recoup its energy to get through the winter.

*If anyone has any tips, questions or suggestions, please comment below.*

**Free food growing advice and support:**

www.foodcommunity.org.uk

www.facebook.com/groups/foodcmty

**Please share**
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4 days ago

Comment on Facebook

My rhubarb grows a beautiful flowering head each year and makes lots of seed by early Autumn.

I’ve brought a split part from my Dad’s parent plant. It’s currently in a wee pot by itself where I work out the beat place to put it. Shade? Half light? Full sun? Deep, or not really? Help! 🙌 ☺️

When I moved into my house last September there was a rhubarb plant left by previous tenants. I thought I would have seen signs of it by now as I keep seeing rhubarb posts but nothing yet.

# **Chia Seeds sprouted on paper towels**

If you haven’t tried this before, I recommend giving it a go. Chia Seed sprouts are dead easy to grow indoors with just a paper towel and water and are great for adding to hot or cold meals. They are packed with fiber, protein, calcium, omega-3 fatty acids, zinc, antioxidants and various micronutrients.

You can pick up a 1kg of organic Chia Seeds for around £8 and this will keep in Chia Sprouts for ages. Simply wet a paper towel, sprinkle the seeds on top, spray them with water, keep them damp by spraying twice a day, wait around a week, then snip them off when you want them. That’s it. They don’t need soil and they don’t need light. When you have snipped off all you need, you add the left overs to the compost heap. Nice, clean, easy, nutritious handy indoor food supply.

You might be able to find low-cost Chia Sprouts and other Sprouts in supermarkets, but sprouting them yourself makes it easier to access them totally fresh each day and avoids all the supermarket packaging and transportation. Sprouting from your own bag of seeds will also work out cheaper.

FREE food growing support from Food Community www.facebook.com/groups/foodcmty/
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4 weeks ago

Comment on Facebook

and great for kids to grow 🙂

I was just starting some alfalfa sprouts, will try this too, never thought to sprout chia, I usually just sprinkle them in my breakfast. Thanks.

Love this♥️

I will try this, thank you! I've been sprouting mung beans but a bit tired of picking the skins out so this may make a nice change 🙂

I did this last year. Thanks to this group. Enjoyed them in my salads.

Amazing ! I am going to try this . I love moong bean spouts . And would to try broccoli sprouts also meant to be super nutritious 🙏

I do watercress that way, need to try chia seeds sprouts ☺️👍🏻

Inspiring!! 😲👏

Lou Cox

Thank you for this.

Great idea thanks 😊

Looks fab do you just use the tops it whole stalks? Xx

Yum good idea!

I do this with alfalfa😋

Ah brilliant idea!! I just bought eco friendly recycled paper towels so will definitely try this out 👌💚

I was cooking curry last night and was mulling over trying sprouting some brown mustard seeds so you have inspired me as I just bought a big bag of chia. 🙂

So a layer of wet paper towel, then sprinkle seeds on, job done?

Going to give this a go!

Live your posts..thanks for sharing 💕

Giving it a go 👍

WHAT!!!!! I never knew. Thank you for sharing

Question.. I’ve tried this and some sections look a little fluffy? Any ideas?

2 weeks tomorrow, ready to eat! 🥳 it took it's time but we got there in the end

glad this popped up again as will give it a go. Just trying to get my kitchen tops sorted to get some seeds started

Adam Skelton I did it! Thanks for sharing. Next time I’ll sprinkle more seeds as some parts were a bit sparse.

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I acquired a lot of plants just before Winter and with no time to put them anywhere, my mum popped this ivy (along with a few other plants) in one of my raised beds to keep safe from frost over Winter. 
Its the planter Im planning to grow all my salad leaves.
Do you think this will be a problem growing vegetables in the same soil?
It was only occurred to me yesterday! 😬 🤔  *note, I forgot to mention that Ive took the ivy out and potted up elsewhere so the planter is empty. Its the soil it was in Im concerned about.

I acquired a lot of plants just before Winter and with no time to put them anywhere, my mum popped this ivy (along with a few other plants) in one of my raised beds to keep safe from frost over Winter.
It's the planter I'm planning to grow all my salad leaves.
Do you think this will be a problem growing vegetables in the same soil?
It was only occurred to me yesterday! 😬 🤔

*note, I forgot to mention that I've took the ivy out and potted up elsewhere so the planter is empty. It's the soil it was in I'm concerned about.
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5 days ago

Comment on Facebook

I would move it.

As long as you've moved it I don't see any issues!!

Should be OK, if you could top up with compost even better

Thanks everyone! 🌱

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We have a soil-less back garden with very little sun and regular foxes/cats visiting and marking. Im still determined to grow some veg! I had this great idea of taking a couple of old baths off of the neighbour and turn them into raised beds. I will make a wooden frame of some sort to make it less of an eye sore and drill holes into the bottom etc. Now that theyve actually been delivered Im thinking what on earth did I get myself into!! Please tell me whether Im crazy or a genius 😅 (the idea was that these should be less messy and easier to move than a fixed raised bed if need to be as the decking is bound to go at some point, Im probably over thinking it!)Image attachment

We have a soil-less back garden with very little sun and regular foxes/cats visiting and marking. I'm still determined to grow some veg! I had this great idea of taking a couple of old baths off of the neighbour and turn them into raised beds. I will make a wooden frame of some sort to make it less of an eye sore and drill holes into the bottom etc. Now that they've actually been delivered I'm thinking what on earth did I get myself into!! Please tell me whether I'm crazy or a genius 😅 (the idea was that these should be less messy and easier to move than a fixed raised bed if need to be as the decking is bound to go at some point, I'm probably over thinking it!) ... See MoreSee Less

5 days ago

Comment on Facebook

Are they plastic? Would the cold crack them?

Genius!

What a great idea xxx

Can't wait yo see the finished product recycle reuse love it xxx

This is super clever! If you have the energy and tools maybe mount large wheelbarrow wheels on one end to help you move them as needed in the future? I vote you're a genius, clever clever

You’re not crazy!!! This is my bathtub planter, I didn’t drill an extra holes just leave the plug out and put a load of rubble etc in the bottom.... takes a lot of soil to fill it tho! I grow carrots and beans in it!

Our first beds were in baths. Tilt slightly towards plug end.

Brilliant idea, I'm all for recycling

I have seen pics of this done on here recently, its a great idea

We have one at the wells garden and it works a treat. I also have one in my own garden with the plug hole sealed and it makes a great pond with some big stones in to let the frogs in and out.

Brilliant idea 🌟👏

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5 days ago

HELLO ! I'm in the races lol
I wanted to share my progress this week and celebrating a personal best here. On the 24th I germinated jalapeño seeds and two varieties of tomato. I couldn't believe my eyes when I saw well developed sprouting in only two days !!
I just love my germination technique and have so much success at this. Two days and I was transplanting into soil and today I have baby seedlings popping up everywhere!! On the 24th I also planted marigold and kale seeds and they look beautiful for 4 days. Thanks for reading my post and I hope you all have a great day 🤍💚🤍💚🤍🍅🍆🥕🥂🍻
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7 days ago

Comment on Facebook

Hi Christine 🙂 sprouting in 2 days! wow that is fast!!paper towel method works a treat eh

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